CATCH-22 by Joseph Heller

Set in Italy during World War II, this is the story of the incomparable, malingering bombardier, Yossarian, a hero who is furious because thousands of people he has never met are trying to kill him. But his real problem is not the enemy—it is his own army, which keeps increasing the number of missions the men must fly to complete their service. Yet if Yossarian makes any attempt to excuse himself from the perilous missions he’s assigned, he’ll be in violation of Catch-22, a hilariously sinister bureaucratic rule: a man is considered insane if he willingly continues to fly dangerous combat missions, but if he makes a formal request to be removed from duty, he is proven sane and therefore ineligible to be relieved.

Rating

Sex:

The main character is constantly engaging in sexual acts. It doesn't go into graphic detail.

Bullying/Violence:

There are intense scenes of war violence.

Suspense/Horror:

Language:

Alcohol/Drugs:

Alternative Lifestyle/LGBT:

Naughty Little Tidbits: Disturbing Behaviour, Disrespect Rules/Laws, Bad Role Model

Review

Writing Style:

Plot:

Main Characters:

Overall:

Would I recommend this book for...
Teenagers?No
Adults?No

Comments: I wouldn't say that I regret reading this book, but it felt like reading a joke that went on for far too long. Perhaps 200 pages too long. Heller has an interesting writing style, and I felt like I was reading in a spiral. The first one hundred pages took me a while to get through, as a lot of it didn't quite fit together. He touches on the same material in pieces, and the farther you get into the story the more the pieces fit together. I definitely saw the humor in the storyline, and I chuckled a few times throughout the book. However, by the last 100 pages I was just ready for the story to be over. I think a lot of my exasperation centered around the overt sexualization of all women in the book. It got REALLY old and exhausting.

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